“Jazz Embodies Human Rights”: The Politics of UNESCO’s International Jazz Day

Mario Dunkel, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg:

This article explores the representation of jazz at UNESCO’s International Jazz Day, focusing in particular on the 2016 edition of the event hosted by former President Barack Obama at the White House. It locates Jazz Day in the history of US jazz diplomacy, demonstrating that the event results from strategies of the US government that emerged in the 1950s and sought to use jazz as an emblem of an American social order that was ethically superior to the Soviet Union. While Jazz Day – in the tradition of US jazz diplomacy programs – casts jazz as an embodiment of intercultural dialogue, diversity, and human rights, this article seeks to juxtapose this rhetoric with the event’s economics and politics. It argues that Jazz Day’s messages of diversity, intercultural dialogue, universal human rights, and peace, in their one-dimensional and non-intersectional form, ultimately serve to obfuscate the economic and political power interests that underlie the event. Contrary to its rhetoric, Jazz Day has so far failed to challenge the power structures that lie at the heart of a socially unequal global order built on the denial of basic human rights.

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La Memoria institucional del Festival de Avándaro. Los documentos sobre el festival en el Archivo General de la Nación en México y el Informe Avándaro del gobierno del Estado de México

Yolanda Minerva Campos García, Universidad de Guadalajara:

Continue reading La Memoria institucional del Festival de Avándaro. Los documentos sobre el festival en el Archivo General de la Nación en México y el Informe Avándaro del gobierno del Estado de México

Vol. 12.1 (Jun. 2019)

 

Doing and Undoing Comparisons

Download a .pdf of the complete issue here.
 
Susana Rocha Teixeira, Bielefeld University:
Doing and Undoing Comparisons: An Introduction
Wilfried Raussert, Bielefeld University:
‘We Wear the Mask’: Modern ‘Masks,’ Reflexivity, and Black Practices of Comparing in the Harlem Renaissance
Claudia Hachenberger, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg:
Narcos and the Promotion of an U.S. (Informal) Cultural Empire Based on Processes of Stereotyping and Comparison
Olaf Kaltmeier, Bielefeld University:
Invidious Comparison and the New Global Leisure Class: On the Refeudalization of Consumption in the Old and New Gilded Age
Pablo Campos, Bielefeld University:
‘Early’ and ‘Modern’ indigenist Practices – A Comparative Analysis of the Ecuadorian and the Mexican cases
Elena Furlanetto, University of Duisburg-Essen:
Declensions: Conceptual Migrations across Empires
Yago Quiñones Triana, Universidade de Brasília:
Gilberto Freyre entre duas Américas Latinas: a lusitana e a hispana. Análise da transformação da interpretação do Autor com relação a influência espanhola e portuguesa em América.
Gudrun Rath, University of Art and Design, Linz:
Contesting Inequality. Joseph Anténor Firmin’s De l’égalité des races humaines, 133 years on
Carsten Schinko, University of Stuttgart/HU Berlin:
How (Not) to Compare White Poverty: Class Issues, Socioeconomic Suffering, Literature
Marcus Hartner, Bielefeld University:
Placing Prospero’s Island: (Post)Colonial Practices of Comparing in the Academic Reception of Shakespeare’s The Tempest
Kensedeobong Blessed Okosun, Bielefeld University:
Book Review: Weird American Music